King Princess

From Nonbinary Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

King Princess is a singer, songwriter, and music producer. She rose to fame in 2018 with her singles "1950" and "Talia", before her debut album Cheap Queen was released in 2019.

She was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York; she is the daughter of recording engineer Oliver H. Straus Jr. and Agnes "Aggie" Mullaney. Her parents divorced while she was young. She spent much of her childhood following her father to work at his recording studio, Mission Sound. There, she learned several instruments, including bass, guitar, piano, and drums, as well as music-production techniques and insight into the music industry. After high school, she moved to Los Angeles to study at the USC Thornton School of Music. However, after a year, she dropped out in favor of her music career.

Quotes[edit | edit source]

"I use she as my preferred pronoun. In my experience, she encompasses my gender and my sexuality, which are very different. I Identify as a genderqueer person, and simultaneously as a gay woman and I'm ok with those being at odds with each other sometimes."[1]

"I like being a woman sometimes. I would say 49 percent of the time I love my titties. But I'm not fully a woman. I'm somebody who falls center on the gender spectrum, and it changes day to day. It's just not in me to decide."[2]

"My identities might have once thought to be contradictory but what I love about the time we are living in now is that you can express gender queerness, that you're gay, that you're a lesbian, a girl dating girls. Because I am a girl who dates girls and I have been for a long time. So I am a lesbian. But sometimes I feel like a gay man, you know? Just in my spirit. I'm learning how to be comfortable in between. If you can harness that and feel comfortable in the in-between, it can be freeing and fun. I show it in my art. It's a great perspective to have and I'm happy to have it."[3]

"I've always been kind of a genderqueer person. It's something I kind of came into later 'cause I didn't really think about it as an identity as much as the way it had to do with the people I loved and the way I dressed…I like that I can ride that line on the periphery of femininity. I don't always have to be an active participant. I think that's really freeing."[4]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Menuez, Bobbi. "King Princess". theingenuemagazine.com. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  2. Bagley, Christopher (5 June 2019). "King Princess on the Limits of Being Pop's New Queer Idol". W Magazine | Women's Fashion & Celebrity News. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  3. Macdonald, Jocelyn (31 May 2019). "Exclusive: King Princess on Identity, Pride, and The Inspiration Behind "Talia"". AfterEllen. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  4. Gutowitz, Jill (15 June 2018). "King Princess Is a Genderqueer Pop Icon for the Next Generation of Queer Youth". them. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
Wikipedia logo This article uses material from the Wikipedia article King Princess, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (view authors).