Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

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Genesis Breyer P-Orridge was an English singer-songwriter, musician, poet, performance artist, and occultist who rose to notability as the founder of the COUM Transmissions artistic collective and lead vocalist of seminal industrial band Throbbing Gristle. P-Orridge was also a founding member of Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth occult group, and fronted the experimental band Psychic TV.

P-Orridge and h/er lover Lady Jaye Breyer, who met in 1993, both underwent several surgeries "that would become an artwork merging them into a joint being called a 'pandrogyne.'"[3] Photos of the transformation were published as art pieces, described as "an exploration of evolution and the human condition and its need to evolve and de-evolve through signs of gender neutrality and gender dysphoria seen in modern Homo sapiens."[4][5] P-Orridge did not identify as transgender or transsexual,[6] but was pro trans rights.[7]

Lady Jaye passed away of a heart condition in 2007[4], and Genesis passed away of leukaemia in March 2020.

Quotes[edit | edit source]

« [W]e absolutely 100% believe, women should choose what they do with their own bodies. So should every human being. It's my skin. It's my body. And if I want to change it, that's my right. It's just raw material. It's not sacred. It doesn't belong to a deity. It doesn't belong to the government or any cabal of power brokers. It's mine. The malleability of the body is one of the gifts that we receive, and as technology changes and improves there are more and more choices.[4] »
« Pandrogeny as a concept is not about gender—it's about the ending of all binary perception. It's influenced by the allegory of the path of no distinction—that all definitions, distinctions, values, matters of what could be considered good, bad, delicious, or revolting are all human-made. They're not innate. That's true of identity, which includes gender. For for us it's about erasing the need to even consider gender. [...] Obviously, for me personally, getting breast implants was a rejection of masculinity and the patriarchal society that I had been forced to live in since I was born. But for myself and Lady Jaye, it was about love. It was about becoming each other. It was about two individual beings reuniting into one unified divine being. That is the ultimate aim of pandrogeny. [5] »

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Hoby, Hermione (29 June 2016). "The Reinventions of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge". The New Yorker. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  2. Michael, Michael Love (29 March 2019). "Genesis P-Orridge: Stormtrooper of the Future". PAPER. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  3. Earnest, Jarrett (2020). "S/HE IS (STILL) HER/E". The Brooklyn Rail. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Roberts, Randall (23 October 2019). "Genesis P-Orridge shares their vision for 'gender evolution,' possibly for the last time". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Armstrong, Annie (11 September 2019). "'We Are Optimistic, Aren't We?': Genesis Breyer P-Orridge on Death, Plastic Surgery, and How Pandrogeny Can Save the World". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  6. Juzwiak, Rich (18 March 2020). "A Unique Case, Inevitably: Genesis P-Orridge on H/er Life and Loves in Previously Unpublished Interview". The Muse. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  7. Colucci, Emily (22 October 2019). "Genesis Breyer P-Orridge on H/er Radical Gender and Binary-Deconstructing Art". them. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
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