Ruby Rose

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This article mentions LGBTphobic bullying, child sexual abuse, depression, and suicide attempts; if you are not comfortable with reading about this kind of topic, we suggest you take a step back.

Ruby Rose Langenheim is an Australian model, actor, and television presenter. Rose came to attention as a presenter on MTV Australia (2007–2011), followed by several high-profile modelling gigs, notably as the face of Maybelline New York in Australia. In addition, she has co-hosted various television shows, most notably Australia's Next Top Model (2009) and The Project on Network Ten (2009–2011).

Rose pursued a career in acting from 2008 onwards. She had a small role in the drama Around the Block (2013), and came to global attention for her role in season three of the Netflix series Orange Is the New Black (2015–16). She also had large roles in the action films Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (2016), XXX: Return of Xander Cage (2017) and John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) and co-starred in the musical comedy Pitch Perfect 3 (2017) and the monster film The Meg (2018). She also starred in the lead role of Kate Kane / Batwoman in the first season of the CW television series Batwoman (2019–20).

Rose came out as lesbian at age 12.[3] Because of her sexuality and gender variance, she was bullied, which included verbal and physical abuse by her male peers.[4][5] She was also sexually abused as a child by a relative.[6] Rose experienced suicidal thoughts, and attempted suicide at age 12.[3][4] Commenting on having attempted suicide multiple times throughout her life and being diagnosed with different disorders, including clinical depression (which was initially misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder) and complex post-traumatic stress disorder,[7] she stated that she has struggled with mental health issues all of her life. She added, "What I have learned from the struggles of mental health is just how strong I am."[7]

Rose has said that while growing up, she was convinced she was a boy, and she was saving up money to physically transition from female to male.[5][8] She said, "It was in my mind as something I wanted to do and then I just... didn't. I guess I grew out of it. I even used to sleep on my front because I didn't want to get boobs ever, which I think worked actually."[8] She stated that modelling led her to discover androgyny, and allowed her to model with different gender expressions. She recalled, "I remember being at a yum cha restaurant with my dad and the owner coming up and saying, 'Excuse me, we're trying to work out if you're a handsome boy or a beautiful girl.' It was a compliment and I was shocked, and when I thought about it I actually wanted to be a handsome boy."[9]

In 2014 Rose released Break Free, a short film in which she visually transforms from a very feminine woman to a heavily tattooed man. Soon after this, she came out as nonbinary, saying that in regards to gender "I feel like I'm neither".[5] In 2015 she said, "I am very gender fluid and feel more like I wake up every day sort of gender neutral."[10]

Rose has received some backlash because of being genderfluid and a lesbian:[2]

« When I got cast as a lesbian in Batwoman, I didn't know that being a genderfluid woman meant that I couldn't be a lesbian because I'm not a woman — not considered lesbian enough. My initial response was 'Pfft!' And then I was like, 'Wait. Let me just figure this one out. How do I right this wrong, because if someone out there is upset by this, I need to know why and how to fix it.' That's when I sort of said, 'I'm a woman that identifies as a woman. I'm not trans. But if being gender-fluid means that I can't identify as a woman at any point, then I guess I can't be that.' Maybe I need to make up another term, one that doesn’t step on any toes. One where I can be fluid in my gender, but also a lesbian, because otherwise I'm not sure what I am. »


References[edit | edit source]

  1. Kellaway, Mitch (31 July 2014). "WATCH: Australian Model Ruby Rose Comes Out as Gender Fluid". The Advocate. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Gomez, Patrick (5 June 2019). "Gender-fluid Ruby Rose opens up about the backlash she's received for identifying as a lesbian". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Ruby Rose is back on TV and she's 'fired up and excited about everything again'". News.com.au. 17 May 2015. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Swales, Amy (11 October 2019). "Ruby Rose has an uplifting message for anyone suffering from depression: "We all deserve to be here"". Stylist. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Jarvis, Erika (25 July 2014). "Ruby Rose: 'I used to pray to God that I wouldn't get breasts'". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  6. "Ruby Rose confronts her demons". The Daily Telegraph. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Ryder, Taryn (11 October 2019). "Ruby Rose opens up about depression and past suicide attempts". Yahoo!. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Borden, J.D. (23 June 2015). "10 Things You Want To Know About Ruby Rose, 'Orange is the New Black's New Heartbreaker". Indiewire. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  9. Gillespie, Claire (25 July 2014). "5 Reasons Ruby Rose is killing it right now". SheKnows.com. Retrieved 13 July 2015.
  10. Molloy, Shannon (14 January 2015). "Ruby Rose says she doesn't identify as female or male, after releasing a gender-bending short film". NewsComAu. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
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